April 14, 2013

The Sakura Stalker


I just can't seem to get enough of cherry blossoms!
(and really, who can?)

Took a quick weekend trip back up to Yamamoto
to help out at a couple of farms after the crazy wind they had.

And we were lucky enough to see the cherry blossoms in full bloom!
(more pictures to come...just wanted to warn you ahead of time!)

5 comments:

  1. Don't warn, woman, publish! ;)

    Meanwhile I'll go azalea-hunting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can't wait for your azalea post! I'm crossing my fingers for more sunny weekends as I can't go anywhere during the day on weekdays. Can't wait for hydrangea season, another favorite of mine :D

      Delete
  2. Yay! Not one to just moan about the sad fate of the wind-negated work you did, you went back and helped to redo it!

    And look at the reward you got, and are now rewarding us with. Oh, those cherry blossoms!

    I spent a couple years working in a kind of greenhouse factory. The greenhouses were fiberglass rather than plastic sheeting, though. I liked working with living things but it was pretty tedious, boring work. Every day I knew I could work one more day. Beyond that I could not think about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I of course had to look up fiberglass greenhouses. So interesting how many different kinds there are! Looks like fiberglass is one of the more popular choices.

      I'm still not sure if I could in fact live on a farm and work there everyday...that is much different than just helping out every once in a while. But seeing the plants grow and knowing what you do will directly affect the product seems like a very satisfying job :)

      Delete
  3. This is different than the place I worked but you can get an idea of the scale and monoculture if you click here. The place was so big we used electric carts to get around. They were fun to drive. But the repetitive, factory-style work, done over too great a length of time, I learned, can be brain damaging.

    It wasn’t completely monoculture. We grew these mums, Boston ferns, some crotons, a few marantas, oak-leaf ivy, and schefflera as a few examples. I felt better doing that kind of work rather than knowingly or unwittingly assisting our military in killing people overseas.

    Although mentally denying it is undeniable that such work is life affirming. (I still have a couple 35 year-old potted schefflera, and aloe).

    ReplyDelete